Hautes Complications


Secular Perpetuel Calender

20th Anniversary of this Iconic Watch (1996-2016)

 
 

ABOUT


 

After having manufactured the first ever wristwatch with Jewish Calender – The Hebraïka, ANDERSEN Genève created in 1996 the “Perpetuel Secular Calender”. It was the first 100% perpetuel calendar Horological Wristwatch Calendar programmed for 400 years – or even 800 years. This watch has been adorned by watch collectors worldwide.

To celebrate its 20th Anniversary ANDERSEN Genève adds one more complication and presents the:

“Perpetuel Secular Calender” 20th Anniversary with Days Indication."

The complication is made readable with seven small apertures to indicate the current day. The seven-day week is represented by the sun, the moon and five planets. They are named after contemporary deities, a system introduced in the Roman Empire during Late Antiquity. It starts with the Sun, and then the Moon, Mars (Ares), Mercury (Hermes), Jupiter (Zeus), Venus (Aphrodite) and Saturn (Cronos). The Latin names of planets were simple translations of the Greek names. The 1st day in Latin is named after the Sun (Solis dies), but Christians also consider the Lord's day (Dominicus dies), as in Greek.

 

 

Sunday - SUN

The name comes from the Latin dies solis, meaning "sun's day": the name of a pagan Roman holiday. It is also called Dominica (Latin), the Day of God. The sun is “the chief” of all the astral bodies.

 

Monday - MOON

The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon monandaeg, or the Latin Lunae dies "the moon's day". This second day was sacred to the goddess of the moon.

 

Tuesday - MARS

This day was named after the Norse god Tyr. The Romans named this day after their war-god Mars: dies Martis.

 

Wednesday - MERCURY

The Romans called it dies Mercurii, after their god Mercury.

The day was named in honor to Wodan (Odin).

 

Thursday - JUPITER

The Romans named this day dies Jovis ("Jove's Day"), after Jove or Jupiter, their most important god. The day named after the Norse god Thor. In the Norse languages this day is called Torsdag.

 

Friday - VENUS

To the Romans this day was sacred to the goddess Venus, and was known as dies veneris.

The day is in honor of the Norse goddess Frigg. In Old High German this day was called frigedag.

 

Saturday - SATURN

Saturn is the Roman and Italic god of agriculture and later the god of time (cronos). This day was called dies Saturni, "Saturn's Day", by the ancient Romans in honor of Saturn. In Anglo-Saxon: sater daeg. ek.

 

 

This exceptional watch has two dials:

Front Dial in any gold color (white, BlueGold, Red) or eventually in Platinum, with hand guilloché “diamond eight” motive; days of the week indication with the sun, the moon and five planets hand engraved in (blue or red) Gold.

Hours, Minutes and Seconds indication with blued hands.

Back Dial with “Perpetuel Secular Calender” indication with three counters and blued hands indicating Months, Years and Leap Years.

 

 

HISTORY

Our calendar, which is in use worldwide, is called the Gregorian Calendar. It was introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII in replacement of the Julian Calendar.

The new system adopted the year of 365 days with a leap year of 366 days every 4 years that had already been fixed by Julius Caesar but it revealed to be inexact. Therefore Pope Gregory XIII ordered a calendar reform with a correction of 10 days, whereby the 4th October 1582 of the Julian Calendar was immediately followed by the 15th October 1582 of the Gregorian Calendar.

He also introduced a special secular leap year cycle, i.e. only those secular years which are divisible by 400 are considered to be leap years. Therefore the secular years 1700, 1800, 1900, 2100, 2200, 2300 are not leap years and have only 28 days in February.

Watches with perpetuel calendar usually have the normal leap year cycle. Exceptions are big

astronomic clocks as well as two pocket watches made by Patek Philippe, one being the famous "Calibre 89" and the other is a watch that was made in the seventies for an American collector.

Therefore back to 1996 the ANDERSEN Genève’s “Perpetuel Secular Calender” Wristwatch was the first, hundred percent, perpetuel calendar wristwatch.